Traditional Polish Pierogi

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Traditional Polish Pierogi 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

 

Sauerkraut Filling:

1.8 lbs of Sauerkraut, drained and minced
0.2 lbs of dried Mushroom
2 Onions finely chopped
Vegetable oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Dough:

2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
pinch of salt
2/3 cup of HOT water

 

Directions:

Sauerkraut Filling:

The best is to soak the mushroom in water a day before.

Run cold water over the sauerkraut through sieve to get rid of the strong sour taste. Remove water and chop sauerkraut. Boil mushrooms and chop finely. Chop onions. In a large skillet, heat oil over a medium flame. Saute sauerkraut along with onions and mushrooms. Add salt and pepper ( I like it a little spicy). . Stuff pierogi with about a teaspoon amount of the filling (depending on a size of pierogi).

 

Dough:

Mix fast all ingredients in a large bowl with a spoon and knead lightly in the bowl. Rest dough for one-half hour covered with a kitchen towel.
When it is done, knead the dough a few times on a floured surface and roll out to 1/8-inch thickness. Cut out with a +/- 3-inch drinking glass.

 

Place a teaspoon full of filling in the middle of each dough circle. With floured hands, fold the dough over the filling, and, starting at one end of the resulting crescent, pinch the dough together to enclose the filling. As you pinch the dough closed, continuously work the filling into the pierogi with floured fingers. To cook, drop the pierogies into rapidly boiling water for about 3 -4 minutes, removing them once they float. Make sure the pierogi dough is tightly sealed, or these little dumplings will come apart when boiled.

Once they are boiled, you can fry up some onions in butter (olive oil is optional) and add the cooked pierogies to the pan until browned.
Flip them gently. Add more butter if needed.
Other way is to sautée some onions with bacon and browne the pierogies in it. All mentioned ways wil make the pierogies get slightly crunchy on the outside. Plain boiled are more soft...depends what you like. In Poland both-boiled or browned ways are considered traditional.

Smacznego! Enjoy! (:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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